Seralphia was here
ircimages:

I’m a geology student in Australia. Interned this summer at an opal mine. They find theses opalized fossils there.
dongstomper69:

stunningpicture:

Creative kid. More creative mom.

fucking idiot got owned

dongstomper69:

stunningpicture:

Creative kid. More creative mom.

fucking idiot got owned

adreadfulidea:

They look like they just got caught having a torrid affair. “This isn’t what it looks like, Tom! He meant nothing to me!”

adreadfulidea:

They look like they just got caught having a torrid affair. “This isn’t what it looks like, Tom! He meant nothing to me!”

rufflesnotdiets:

dearie-17:

I just think Nani is the greatest sister ever

This is some of the most realistic sibling dialogue in popular media

question

geekygothgirl:

theracismrepellent:

lukeaesthetic:

i’ve noticed the “kimono” style shirts have become really popular recently and i think that they are super cute but is it appropriation to wear them? i wanted to check before I considered buying one or thinking about it because i don’t want to try and steal part of that culture or anything.

Those are not kimonos, they are literally just cardigans, jackets or whatever. Wear them but don’t call them kimonos. They’re not the traditional kimonos

~Tae

Considering that all kinds of things are labeled “kimono” and it basically boils down to having wide sleeves, just call it a wide-sleeve whatever. You can wear a cute garment and avoid appropriation, everyone wins! 

geekygothgirl:

stuckwith-harry:

thekingofweasels:

Can we just analyze this gif for one second:

image

As the chandelier falls, EVERYONE dives out of the way. Harry, Draco, everyone. EXCEPT Ron. Ron dives TOWARDS it in order to grab Hermione and get her to safety. I just. Why do people ship anything but Romione again? He is the ONLY one that stayed upright AND moved towards the potentially deadly falling object to save the woman he loves. That is all.

[gross sobbing]

Reason #4,560 why people hating on Ron Weasley makes NO GODDAMN SENSE to me. 

eosthetic:

not just a shirt, but a social experiment. love seeing the wide range of reactions i get. (usually smiles and high fives from women, and scoffs and a few murderous glares from men.) 👭👍💕

eosthetic:

not just a shirt, but a social experiment. love seeing the wide range of reactions i get. (usually smiles and high fives from women, and scoffs and a few murderous glares from men.) 👭👍💕

wilburwhateley:

Luis Uribe (there is a color version out there, as well) 

wilburwhateley:

Luis Uribe (there is a color version out there, as well) 

worthless-art:

Map of Our Tribal Nations

Our Own Names and Original Locations

http://www.npr.org/blogs/codeswitch/2014/06/24/323665644/the-map-of-native-american-tribes-youve-never-seen-before

Aaron Carapella, a self-taught mapmaker in Warner, Okla., has pinpointed the locations and original names of hundreds of American Indian nations before their first contact with Europeans.

As a teenager, Carapella says he could never get his hands on a continental U.S. map like this, depicting more than 600 tribes — many now forgotten and lost to history. Now, the 34-year-old designs and sells maps as large as 3 by 4 feet with the names of tribes hovering over land they once occupied.

"I think a lot of people get blown away by, ‘Wow, there were a lot of tribes, and they covered the whole country!’ You know, this is Indian land," says Carapella, who calls himself a "mixed-blood Cherokee" and lives in a ranch house within the jurisdiction of the Cherokee Nation.

For more than a decade, he consulted history books and library archives, called up tribal members and visited reservations as part of research for his map project, which began as pencil-marked poster boards on his bedroom wall. So far, he has designed maps of the continental U.S., Canada and Mexico. A map of Alaska is currently in the works.

What makes Carapella’s maps distinctive is their display of both the original and commonly known names of Native American tribes, according to Doug Herman, senior geographer at the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

"You can look at [Carapella’s] map, and you can sort of get it immediately," Herman says. "This is Indian Country, and it’s not the Indian Country that I thought it was because all these names are different."

He adds that some Native American groups got stuck with names chosen arbitrarily by European settlers. They were often derogatory names other tribes used to describe their rivals. For example, “Comanche” is derived from a word in Ute meaning “anyone who wants to fight me all the time,” according to the Encyclopaedia Britannica.

"It’s like having a map of North America where the United States is labeled ‘gringos’ and Mexico is labeled ‘wetbacks,’ " Herman says. "Naming is an exercise in power. Whether you’re naming places or naming peoples, you are therefore asserting a power of sort of establishing what is reality and what is not."

Look at a map of Native American territory today, and you’ll see tiny islands of reservation and trust land engulfed by acres upon acres ceded by treaty or taken by force. Carapella’s maps serve as a reminder that the population of the American countryside stretches back long before 1776 and 1492.

Carapella describes himself as a former “radical youngster” who used to lead protests against Columbus Day observances and supported other Native American causes. He says he now sees his mapmaking as another way to change perceptions in the U.S.

"This isn’t really a protest," he explains. "But it’s a way to convey the truth in a different way."

mythicarticulations:

Announcing the original “Chupacabra in a Can”! This poseable Chupacabra skeleton is finally completed and up for sale! You can find it in our Etsy store.

orevet:

gentlemanbones:

jawnsolo:

baturday:

Baby bat gets the hiccups

i giggled like a schoolgirl

"I hope the ASPCA isn’t watching."

"I really did not mean to do that."

nerdfaceangst:

anigrrrl2:

the-goddamazon:

fuckyeahbiguys:

"I’m sick of how bisexuality is erased in LGBT spaces. I get really nervous before any LGBT event, especially Pride. I feel incredibly sad and hopeless when gay and lesbian people call me insulting names. If gay and lesbian people don’t understand me – Continue reading Prejudice at Pride at Empathize This

This just punched me in the heart.

It’s hard to admit that this happens in our community, but it definitely does. Speaking out is the only way it will stop. 

This is why I would like more people to go to Pride events even if they aren’t Bisexual, so that they can be there to help create a safe space for everyone. It’s important we defend each other and our rights to exist.

thehpalliance:

If you use YouTube, you need to know this.
You’ve heard all these rumblings about Net Neutrality over the past several months. Let’s get real: this is about controlling online video. It is estimated that by 2017, video content will account for 80-90% of all global Internet traffic.
This isn’t just about not being able to binge-watch a series on Netflix. It’s about the future of online video as we know it.
Whether your YouTube channel is home to daily vlogs, short films, or just that one video from when the cinnamon challenge seemed like a good idea, you’re a video creator. Your content and comments help shape this community. Let’s keep it that way.
Net Neutrality means that your YouTube videos reach people at the same speed as clips from last night’s episode of the Tonight Show. It means a level playing field for video creators looking to reach an audience. But new Net Neutrality rules could mess that up.
Here’s the deal: Telecommunications companies already charge us to access the Internet through our homes and our phones. New FCC rules could allow them to also charge content providers (like YouTube, Netflix, and even PBS) for access to our eyeballs. It could create a fast lane for Jimmy Fallon’s clips, and slow lane for your YouTube videos.
It is really important that the FCC understands that online video creators care about Net Neutrality. Even if you’ve only ever uploaded ONE VIDEO, you are a creator and you have a voice.
If you can, please add your channel to our petition. We’ll deliver this to the FCC in September and demonstrate that the online video community cares about this issue. 
Sign the petition, then spread the word.

thehpalliance:

If you use YouTube, you need to know this.

You’ve heard all these rumblings about Net Neutrality over the past several months. Let’s get real: this is about controlling online video. It is estimated that by 2017, video content will account for 80-90% of all global Internet traffic.

This isn’t just about not being able to binge-watch a series on Netflix. It’s about the future of online video as we know it.

Whether your YouTube channel is home to daily vlogs, short films, or just that one video from when the cinnamon challenge seemed like a good idea, you’re a video creator. Your content and comments help shape this community. Let’s keep it that way.

Net Neutrality means that your YouTube videos reach people at the same speed as clips from last night’s episode of the Tonight Show. It means a level playing field for video creators looking to reach an audience. But new Net Neutrality rules could mess that up.

Here’s the deal: Telecommunications companies already charge us to access the Internet through our homes and our phones. New FCC rules could allow them to also charge content providers (like YouTube, Netflix, and even PBS) for access to our eyeballs. It could create a fast lane for Jimmy Fallon’s clips, and slow lane for your YouTube videos.

It is really important that the FCC understands that online video creators care about Net Neutrality. Even if you’ve only ever uploaded ONE VIDEO, you are a creator and you have a voice.

If you can, please add your channel to our petition. We’ll deliver this to the FCC in September and demonstrate that the online video community cares about this issue.

Sign the petition, then spread the word.